Archives for category: Nigeria

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THROWING SHADE

“To talk trash about a friend or acquaintance, to publicly denounce or disrespect. When throwing shade it’s immediately obvious to on-lookers that the thrower, and not the throwee, is the bitchy, uncool one.”

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voguingcover

One more week to the presidential debate in Nigeria.

I must say, I’m really looking forward to watching the candidates address some (hopefully) serious issues. They will certainly have to work for my vote this time round if they expect me to leave the comfort of my bed come February 14th.

On with today’s post.

So it’s Friday and we need to shake a leg or two and nothing does it quite better like good vogueing music from the the Sound Factory days circa 1990.

Check out this track from Eliis D titled, ‘Just Like A Queen’.

The repetitious rhythms, high-hats, and cowbells are almost spiritual.

My Friday high has officially been achieved! #WERQ

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Coffee with plantain is always a winning combination if you ever need a little pick-me-up

The Ibeyi’s Yoruba Doom Soul is my pick of the day.

The french Afro-Cuban sisters, daughters of the famous Cuban percussionist, Miguel ‘Anga’ Diaz, are cutting a path for themselves, serving up spiritual sounds mixed with hip-hop, electronica and Yoruba lore from Nigeria.

Channeling their musical energy from their Afro-Cuban heritage, the twins see themselves as part of a new breed of musicians seeking to push the boundaries of the music scene in the African Diaspora.

Below is their video for a track titled ‘Rivers’, dedicated to the the goddess Oshun, the mother of the Ibeyi which means “twins” in Yoruba.

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Sunday just keeps getting better. After a bad ass cardio session I decided to hit the web for a quick looksy on what new sounds are trending. Okay Africa is always a good place to start.

I present to you The Ibibio Sound Machine, an eight piece band that is dedicated to revitalizing Afro funk for the 70s & 80s with firm foundation in electronica. The band’s front lady, Eno Williams,  a British songstress of Nigerian heritage, writes her songs based on folklore from Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria that her parents would tell her as a kid.

Your body can’t help but runaway to, “The Talking Fish (Asem U Sem Iyak). The plucky guitar rhythms and slinky percussion, and wonky electronics is reminiscent of the Nigerian disco-funk music movement of the 1970s.

We need to get them down to Abuja ASAP!

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One of the more popular Nigerian commercials from the 80s. I use to have a maddening crush on the joy girl in the video. I wonder where she is?

Fight-Scene-teaser

Nigerian action movies are somewhat considered like unicorns. They quite frankly do not exist. When you look at it from a purely business standpoint – why should I spend money on producing an action flick when I can easily churn out BBM Babes and Insta Chics for half the time & money? So that’s it. End of discussion.

However, a dialogue has finally started that could be a game changer.

Fight scene is the debut of film-maker Korexcalibur’s. It’s his directional debut showcasing the capability of Nigerian filmmakers to do a fight scene that could be from any standard action film. Please note that this is not a movie but a demonstration of what can be done with the right direction.

It’s not perfect but it’s certainly capturing the imagination of people online. Let’s hope it evolves into a movie 🙂

Check  out the video below.